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December 22, 2011

ASICS Signs Multi-Year Partnership with Honda LA Marathon

ASICS America Corporation is proud to announce its partnership with the Honda LA Marathon as the official apparel and footwear sponsor. This will be ASICS’ first sponsorship of the iconic “Stadium to the Sea” race that will take place Sunday, March 18, 2012. This marks yet another ASICS’ sponsorship of a major marathon worldwide, including the ING New York City Marathon, Tokyo Marathon and Paris Marathon.

The Honda LA Marathon is one of the four largest marathons in the U.S. and one of the ten largest worldwide. The “Stadium to the Sea” course runs through four cities – Los Angeles, West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica – and the federal VA property, taking runners past a highlight reel of sites starting at Dodger Stadium and including landmarks such as Grauman’s Chinese Theater (mile 11.5), Sunset Strip (mile 14), Rodeo Drive (mile 17) and finishing at the Santa Monica Pier.

“We are extremely proud that ASICS has added the Honda LA Marathon to its world-class stable of races around the globe, including Tokyo, Paris and New York,” says Nick Curl, Chief Operating Officer of the LA MARATHON LLC. “ASICS is a premier company with a tremendous track record in the running community. We look forward to working in partnership with ASICS in the coming years to take the Honda LA Marathon to even greater heights.”

As the official apparel and footwear sponsor, ASICS has the opportunity to promote the partnership nationally and locally with media, as well as manufacture and sell co-branded licensed marathon merchandise. In addition, ASICS will integrate its activation marketing campaign into race week festivities.

“We are excited to be part of this growing race,” says ASICS Vice President of Marketing, Erik Forsell. “The landscape of a city like Los Angeles will allow us to expand and demonstrate our marketing efforts like we do in New York and enable us to partner with the biggest marathons on the east and west coasts.”

The “Stadium to the Sea” course debuted in 2010 with a record total of more than 26,000 participants. In 2011, Ethiopia’s Markos Geneti shattered the course record by nearly two minutes, with a worldclass time of 2:06:35.

For more information on the Honda LA Marathon visit www.lamarathon.com.

ABOUT LA MARATHON LLC
We inspire athletes and connect communities. With thousands of volunteers, tens of thousands of participants, and hundreds of thousands of spectators, the Honda LA Marathon is one of the largest organized road races in the country. www.lamarathon.com

December 21, 2011

Sometimes a journey can have a bump in the road

Follow Rachel’s day-to-day training on her twitter and facebook pages and read more of Rachel’s marathon experience every other Sunday in the San Gabriel Valley Tribune.

By Rachel Luna, Staff Writer
Posted: 12/17/2011 06:15:29 AM PST

I’m running the distance, 14 miles and counting now. But the distance will have to be put on hold.

I hit a speed bump in my marathon journey and it’s slowing me down – at least for the moment.

I tweaked my knee. Here’s the inside scoop: it wasn’t while running. In fact, it had nothing to do with running. I got injured doing nothing out of the ordinary.

Last Saturday I was clearing out my bookshelf. As I had a few books in my hands, I twisted to my left to set the books down, and bam! Pain hit my left knee instantly. The pain put me down for the count by the time the evening rolled around. I hobbled around for the rest of the weekend and unfortunately had to miss my first half-marathon race.

I was tempted to still try to make it to the race, figured that wouldn’t be the smartest thing to do.

A few days passed, I gave in and finally went to the doctor to get my knee examined. The doctor suspects I may have torn a ligament or the meniscus in my knee after an initial examination.

I’ll have to see a specialist and get an MRI to know the actual results of the injury.

So for now, crutches are my ticket to getting around until I see the doctor again this week. I can’t stand the crutches. Thanks to them, now I have to deal with pain in my palms, arms and shoulders… and my original knee pain.

It’s not all bad though. I’ve turned my work chair into my daily wheelchair while I’m in the newsroom. It’s way better than the crutches, and a lot more fun. I’m just this little blur rolling by.

Also, I’ve always wanted to ride around in one of those motorized scooters at the store. Now I have a legitimate excuse.

Despite the injury, I’m hoping it won’t keep me out of my training for too long.

No running is allowed, but I hope to eventually get some training done in a swimming pool just to get me going.

But before I do that, I gotta go out and buy a wetsuit. I have a pool at my house, but there’s no way I’m going to train at 6 a.m. in a freezing pool without being bundled up.

Until I find out more about my knee, I’m going keep a positive attitude. There’s still plenty of time before the Honda L.A. Marathon – 91 days to be exact.

After all I have to remember: Life’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon.

December 14, 2011

Runner’s body rebels, but there’s still hope for a strong finish

You can follow C.J.’s day-to-day training on her twitter page and watch for her stories in the Los Angeles Daily News.


By C.J. Lin, Daily News Staff Writer
Posted: 12/11/2011 01:00:00 AM PST

One step forward, two steps back.

Unfortunately, that’s not very helpful when you’re trying to run a marathon.

For the last few weeks, my training has been at a literal standstill.

I did eight miles one freezing morning about a month after I started running, and I guess I pushed too much too soon. What I thought was a lingering soreness in the arches of my feet was actually plantar fasciitis, where the tissue connecting the heel to toes becomes inflamed.

Oh, and somehow I blew out my knees, too.

Unfortunately, (again) these types of injuries are inevitable for runners, whether they be newbies or veterans, said Rayna Drago, coach of the L.A. Roadrunners marathon training group in Westlake Village.

“Marathon running is a real shock to your body,” Drago said. “Even if you’ve been athletic, it’s just something different for your body to take in all those miles. Your body is just waking up and saying, `Hello, what are we doing here?”‘

The most common injuries are shin splints, runner’s knee, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and some type of foot fracture, according to Dr. John Pagliano, a Long Beach sports medicine podiatrist.

And there’s more bad news – they’ll probably keep popping up for the first year for new runners.

“Your body’s just kind of got to learn what’s coming,” Drago said. “But it does subside after the first year.”

I don’t have a year. I only have three more months until the L.A. Marathon.

Suffice it to say, I’m getting pretty nervous. The finish line always seemed just a bit out of my reach, but even more so now.

But, I (and you) shouldn’t be discouraged, Drago said.

“It’s more frustrating than anything,” Drago said. “But it’s good when it happens at the beginning of training rather than at the end.”

For these types of overuse injuries, it doesn’t take too long to heal and get back up to speed, Drago said.

Be sure to ice anything that hurts and rest. But the key is to keep moving, just not in high-impact exercises.

“It’s also for your mental balance, that if you’re not running, at least I’m doing something,” she said.

Take a break by hopping on a bike, getting on the elliptical, going for a walk, swimming laps or even jogging in the pool, Drago said.

Take ibuprofen for the pain, and make sure you stretch sufficiently.

You’ll want to build up the muscles around the knee by doing strength training such as squats and lunges to help support you on those long miles, according to experts.

Pagliano recommends strength workouts three times a week on alternate days, which should include upper body strengthening.

And if the pain lingers for more than two weeks, that’s when you should go see someone.

Some tips to avoid running injuries include: shortening your stride, running on even surfaces, cross-training, and getting shoes fitted to your gait at a specialty running store, according to Runners’ World magazine.

So, there’s hope yet. I just have to take it easy for a couple of weeks.

“It’s possible to get right back out there and get back on it,” Drago said.

“And your body will just come along for the ride.”

December 13, 2011

Holiday Survival Guide



We’re bringing back an oldie, but goodie!  Our Holiday Survival Guide has 10 nutrition and running tips to get you through the Holiday Season and its festivities without slowing you down!

Whether you’re a seasoned athlete or an everyday Joe, the season from Thanksgiving through New Year’s can wreak havoc on the waistline – and more. Rod Dixon, LA Marathon Director of Training, and Matt Mahowald, LA Marathon Nutrition and Supplement Consultant, offer their tips for enjoying the holidays – and holiday menus – without sabotaging your diet, exercise or training routine.

  1. Never show up hungry to a holiday party or meal. Make sure you have a big breakfast and enjoy at least two good meals or snacks before the feast. This will minimize the amount of overeating. For instance, 12 almonds and an apple will help to quell your appetite so that when you get to that meal you don’t overeat.
  2. The most important item during the holiday season is water. Water helps your body synthesize carbs. It helps with the high and lows of blood sugar that come with desserts and sweets that we don’t normally have in our diet.
  3. If you are going to attend a holiday party and plan on drinking alcohol, consume a full eight to 10 ounces of water in addition to a beverage of your choice. This will minimize the amount of alcohol you drink.
  4. When eating appetizers or pot luck style, the best choices are vegetables, lean proteins and fruits. If you’re designated to bring a dish to a gathering, bring something that’s a healthy choice for yourself. You never know what’s going to be presented in front of you and you always want to have good options.
  5. Fill your plate modestly, and wait 30 minutes after you finish before going back for seconds. This will allow your blood sugar and insulin levels to adjust. You may find that you won’t really be hungry for that second plate.
  6. Treat dessert as a treat. Serve yourself a small portion, and stop there.
  7. A good cardiovascular workout for 2-3 days after your holiday will help deplete excess storage of carbs and fat that you picked up during the holiday.
  8. If it’s possible, throw in an extra two days of 30 minute cardiovascular activity. Remember that walking is just as good as a slow jog and easier on your body.
  9. Consistency is key to your exercise program. Don’t let the holidays derail you by missing too many days in a row of your routine. Don’t try to make up what you’ve missed by overtraining – just get back on your plan.
  10. Remember that it is a holiday, so do let yourself enjoy. The following day wake up and get right back on your food plan and exercise.
December 7, 2011

A support system can go a long way

Follow Rachel’s day-to-day training on her twitter and facebook pages and read more of Rachel’s marathon experience every other Sunday in the San Gabriel Valley Tribune.

By Rachel Luna, Staff Writer
Posted: 12/04/2011 06:37:06 PM PST

It’s official. I ran a half marathon. Well, a half marathon length (13.1miles) in my training, not a race.

But it still counts. It’s definitely a major breakthrough.

My training group even rewarded me with a chocolate medal of excellence for my accomplishment, which I ate shortly after showing it off.

Hunger and a desire for a chocolate treat are to blame. It was my first running award … darn!

My photo instincts managed to kick in just in time to snap a memorable photo before it was too late.

It’s the little things keeping me running. I’ve gotten so used to having a support group behind me through this experience.

And there’s nothing better than training with a group to top it all off.

Each Saturday, 200 of my closest running buddies from the Inland Empire L.A. Roadrunners and I run together, encouraging one another to keep up the training and stay focused on our marathon goal.

The program has become an automatic reliance to keep my training consistent. The extra bonuses with being a part of a running group are all the water stations that keep me hydrated along the routes and the complimentary treats table to enjoy after a long run with everybody.

I don’t have to worry about a thing when I stick with the group.

However, I faced a big hurdle when I had to complete the 13-mile-training. I had to do it alone and had no idea what to expect. Without my accustomed “safety net,” I prepared myself for a lonely half marathon in the Northern California countryside in the middle of nowhere.

It was a thrill knowing I’d reach the half marathon point, but nerve-wracking to face the reality I wouldn’t have anyone talk to or train with during the run.

It was a long run – a two hour and 52 minute run/walk to be exact (it took a little longer because I kept slowing down to take photos). But it flew by.

And the best part was I still had my support group interacting with me via social media. I got the pleasure of sharing my experience of running in the boonies with others.

It helps that I’ve somewhat learned how to tweet while running … when it’s safe.

My first half marathon experience was an unusual accomplishment in my training process. It never felt like the lonely 13.1 miles I expected.

So to all my running mates, followers and readers out there, thanks for your continued support in my endeavor.

I’m nearly halfway through it and at the rate I’m going, I think it’s safe to say I’m going to stick around to see how my adventure ends.

SUNDAY, MARCH 15, 2015