The Official Blog of the LA Marathon


February 14, 2012

Honda is bringing back the Marathon participant name-wrapped vehicles!



Runners must be registered by February 15 at Noon (PST) for their name to appear on pace cars

Last year, for the first time ever, Honda wrapped two of the elite pace vehicles with approximately 18,000 marathon participant’s names.  The name-covered cars were shown publicly during the pre-Marathon Expo at Dodger Stadium, as well as on display at the Finish Line Festival.  We encouraged participants to take pictures of their names and the feedback from runners was so great that Honda has not only decided to bring back the name-wrapped cars, but is adding an additional vehicle to the fleet!

If you missed out on seeing your name on the cars last year, then make sure you take advantage of this return activation for the 2012 Honda LA Marathon by registering for the marathon by Wednesday, February 15 at Noon (PST).  This is a unique photo opportunity you don’t want to miss!  Plus, how many runners can brag about having their name lead the elite marathoners to the finish line!

Again this year the Honda vehicles will be showcased at the two-day expo and post-race for more great photo ops!  To help you find your name race weekend, every runner registered by the February 15 deadline will have their name arranged in alphabetical order by last name split between one of three cars.

Of course, time is short for those who have not yet registered and want to have their name included on one of the three wrapped pace cars: the deadline of February 15 is tomorrow at Noon (PST)! Click here for quick and easy online registration for the 27th edition of the race on the iconic Stadium to the Sea course that will begin at Dodger Stadium, run through Chinatown, downtown Los Angeles, Little Tokyo, Hollywood, West Hollywood, Beverly Hills, the Veterans Administration property in West Los Angeles and finish on Ocean Avenue in Santa Monica.



February 8, 2012

ASICS Launches Support Your Marathoner Program For 2012 Honda LA Marathon



ASICS America Corporation, a proud partner of the 2012 Honda LA Marathon, has expanded its award-winning “Support Your Marathoner” program to the West Coast. Similar to the program offered at the 2011 ING New York City Marathon, it allows friends and family to send pictures, texts, and video messages of support to the marathon runner of their choice on race day.

Utilizing innovative technology, motivational messages can be delivered directly to an individual runner, precisely as they run past one of two giant video screens placed in various locations on the race course. Friends and family are encouraged to visit www.supportyourmarathoner.com to upload messages.

Social media will deliver additional moments of inspiration to runners, ensuring that no marathoner has to finish the race alone. The enhanced program now links the website (www.supportyourmarathoner.com) to the runner’s personal Facebook page allowing them to share requests for support with their entire online network. Additionally, every time a message of support is uploaded, the runner’s entire Facebook community is alerted, and encouraged to upload more messages. The Support Your Marathoner website also gives runners their own personalized support gallery of messages, pictures and videos to have after the race.

“We have a strong commitment to the athletes that make the courageous and life-changing decision to run a marathon,” says ASICS Vice President of Marketing Erik Forsell. “Each runner has to dig deep to get through those grueling 26.2 miles, and we believe nothing is more motivating than the support of family and friends.  We have seen firsthand the difference Support Your Marathoner can make in getting someone to the finish line, and we are proud to bring it to the Honda LA Marathon.”

The Support Your Marathoner website (www.supportyourmarathoner.com) is live now, and will be supported by email blasts from the Honda LA Marathon and ASICS’ own growing social media community.  Fans can follow the tweets and create their own with #ASICSrunsLA.

It’s not too late to register and train for the 2012 Honda LA Marathon with ASICS’ exclusive six-week training schedule by Coach Andrew Kastor. For more information and to register visit www.asicsamerica.com/lamarathon/marathon_training.aspx and www.lamarathon.com.

 



February 6, 2012

Training for the Honda LA Marathon: Runner learns walking now and then can be good

C.J. Lin, staff writer at the L.A. Daily News is training for her first marathon, the Honda LA Marathon.  You can follow C.J.’s day-to-day progress on her twitter page and watch for her stories in the Los Angeles Daily News.

By C.J. Lin,
Staff Writer Posted: 02/04/2012 06:13:27 PM PST
Updated: 02/04/2012 06:16:18 PM PST

“I don’t want to discourage you, but…” are not the words you want to hear from a marathon coach.

Still, that’s what the coach of a Pasadena marathon training group said to me when I told her that with 10 weeks left until the Honda LA Marathon, the farthest that I had run was eight miles. The group had already done 18.

I’d been out injured with plantar fasciitis since November, and the holidays hadn’t helped with my training.

But with a bit of time to heal, and with my resolve steeled by a new year, I was ready to get back into the game.

Still, I wasn’t feeling 100 percent. So that’s when, at the suggestion of some readers, I decided to go with the run-walk method. (Please don’t judge me.)

Being new to this whole running thing, I hadn’t known that there was such a “method.” I always thought that you either ran the whole thing, or walked whenever you got tired.

With this approach, you take short walk breaks after running for a set amount of time, before you get so tired that you’re forced to walk. The technique actually helps runners record faster times because they don’t slow down at the end of a long run, according to Jeff Galloway, a member of the 1972 Olympic marathon team.

The method uses different sets of muscles, keeping the legs fresh and helping conserve energy, according to Galloway’s website.

“When a muscle group, such as your calf, is used continuously step by step, it fatigues relatively soon,” according to Galloway. “The weak areas get overused and force you to slow down later or scream at you in pain afterward. By shifting back and forth between walking and running muscles, you distribute the workload among a variety of muscles, increasing your overall performance capacity.”

Louie Lopez, a Porter Ranch resident who, at 56, will be running his first marathon, is using the technique to cross the race off his bucket list.

Like me and most new runners, Lopez was facing a litany of aches and pains in his knees and hamstrings. And after a long run, it would take most of the week for him to recover, only for it to be time for another long run.

“I was to the point where I was really wondering if I could finish the marathon,” said Lopez, who slowed down to a pace of running for three minutes, and walking for one.

It’s done wonders for him. He ran 10 miles on his own on Thursday, came away with some light soreness, and will do a 13-miler this weekend.

“I’m able to complete the mileage for the day and not have any borderline injury,” Lopez said. “I recover much, much quicker.”

And for Bynette Hebert, who leads the fastest run-walk group – six minutes running, one minute walking – at L.A. Roadrunners in Westlake Village, the method also offers a mental break.

Instead of counting down to the 26th mile, it’s just a matter of looking forward to the next walk break.

“People don’t think they’re running straight through the entire thing,” said Hebert, of Agoura. “It’s not as stressful. It’s only six more minutes.

“It’s not like, `Oh my gosh, I have to keep this up for four more hours.”‘ And the group only finishes about five to 10 minutes after an 11:45 mile run group.

So for my first long run since my injury, I did 10 miles using a ratio of running for six minutes, and walking for one in January.

And I felt great.

I finished the 10 miles in a little more than two hours, and I think I surprised some of my companions that I was able to keep up. I definitely surprised myself. Hopefully, I surprised that coach.

But then last week, I tried the method during a 13-mile run with the L.A. Roadrunners – and I wanted to die.

That run was by far the worst of all the runs I had done. For the last five miles, all I wanted to do was walk the rest of the way. My soles hurt, my calf was cramping, I was cursing the sun, and every time I saw a pine cone, I would contemplate stepping on it and maybe breaking a leg so I wouldn’t have to run the damn marathon.

But I persisted. I had to walk mile 11, and part of 12 and 13, but I did it.

Afterwards, I found that my Achilles heel was bleeding because my shoe had been chafing, and my legs felt like they were imploding.

Maybe that coach wasn’t so far off. Still, I’m chalking it up to a stomach bug and working late during the week, stopping me from eating and training as well as I would have liked.

Discouraging? Definitely. Discouraged? Not yet.



January 24, 2012

Musings on Winter Marathon Training

Follow James’s day-to-day training on his Twitter and Facebook pages and read more of James and his exercise regimen at Chatelaine.
 
By, James Fell
 
See that picture on the left? That’s me running in -27ºC. I posted the pic to my Facebook fan page and the general consensus revealed in the comments is that I’m bat crap crazy!

I’m not though. At least, I don’t feel crazy. I suppose most crazy people don’t feel crazy, however.

Whatever, I just think of myself as motivated, and with good reason. First off, this is me walking the talk. In terms of talk, I have this article to live up to. Another part is the Theory of Planned Behaviour. I wrote this article for my Los Angeles Times column that explains how registering for a race can motivate you to train for it. Well, I’ve registered for the Honda LA Marathon this March 18th, so even if it’s hideously below zero, I need to get out there and train for it.

There is also the fact that I’ve gone public. This is called “extrinsic motivation.” What it means is: I’ve told you, my LA Times readers, and a bunch of friends that I’m running this marathon. My race time and story is going to be public knowledge for a few hundred thousand readers. Tell me that wouldn’t motivate you to train for a good time.

I’ll add a caveat here. I’m still experiencing some odd foot issues after torquing it on the pedal while riding my bike a few weeks ago. It has been somewhat interfering with my training, but fingers and other body parts are crossed that I’ll be able to recover soon. I’m taking rehabilitative steps.

Now, about this hideously cold run. It wasn’t bad at all for a couple of reasons. I’ve done this before, so I’m confident in my abilities, and I’ve got the gear. I know exactly what I need to wear to stay comfortable at that temperature.

It had been a while since I’d run in weather that cold and I forgot that you don’t want to wear sunglasses in such temperatures. One reason is that the metal frame conducts cold and will freeze the bridge of your nose, and the other is that within two minutes they fog up and you can’t see a damn thing. As a result, I whacked my head on a low-hanging branch and said, “To hell with the sunglasses!” I jammed them in a pocket next to my mylar space blanket that I take in case I fall and break something to prevent freezing to death before help arrives. And yes, I had my iPhone too. That’s how I took the picture.

Speaking of that photo, notice the frosty eyelashes? That was actually a good thing. I couldn’t wear sunglasses, but the frost coating did an amazing job of cutting out the sun’s glare. Excuse me if I think that’s cool.



January 23, 2012

Finally finding relief to knee injury, even without MRI

Follow Rachel’s day-to-day training on her twitter and facebook pages and read more of Rachel’s marathon experience every other Sunday in the San Gabriel Valley Tribune.

By Rachel Luna, Staff Writer
Posted: 01/21/2012 06:13:54 AM PST

I wasn’t thrilled with the fact that I pretty much got brushed off by my insurance company when I wanted an MRI to diagnosis my knee.

The alternative (and by alternative, I mean cheapskate) plan was to throw me into physical therapy for a few weeks before reevaluating my injury to decide whether it was worth putting out the money for the MRI test.

If I were a professional athlete, the scenario would be a different story.

For one, I would have gotten an MRI on the same day I tweaked my knee – more than a month ago.

And who knows, maybe the scenario might have come along with some new groundbreaking medical treatment I could have been the first to try successfully.

But I’m obviously not a pro athlete, just a regular person.

And the last time I checked I didn’t see a medical express lane, so I’ve taken a service number and I’m waiting to be called.

Despite the runaround, I’ve managed to stay positive about my situation, and I’m definitely not out of the Honda L.A. Marathon yet.

I’m not a quitter – I’ve never been. I never will be.

And with my determination to remain optimistic, I’ve traded my training schedule for physical therapy sessions.

For nearly three weeks I’ve been going to therapy sessions twice a week. The hour treatment starts off with muscle stimulation therapy on my knee for 20 minutes, followed by ultrasound heat therapy and ending with several stretching and muscle strengthening exercises.

The therapy sessions are working so far. I have my good days and bad days with my left knee, but overall the recovery process is moving along steadily.

And finally, Jan. 18, I got an accurate diagnosis – without an MRI. According to my physical therapist, Patellar Tendonitis is the likely problem.

The discovery came after he examined my knee and realized I have a stiff knee.

Apparently, if you shift your knee cap towards the outside of your leg, it should be able to be flexible enough to move it over. Turns out that isn’t the case with my knee. My tendons are tight around the outside of my left knee, and they aren’t allowing it to budge much at all in that direction.

The discovery makes sense to me since I was twisting to my left when I got injured.

So now the specialized treatment begins. And oh man does it hurt!

I’ve really had to resist my natural instinct to slug my physical therapist – in a good way – as he’s doing treatment to loosen those stubborn tendons.

During last Friday’s treatment, I experienced the worst therapy pain I’ve had since I started going to physical therapy, but it’s been the most relief I’ve felt in my knee to date.

I appreciate all the treatment my physical therapist is doing since it’s now getting me closer to lacing up my running shoes again.

Another six to eight treatment sessions should do the trick, hopefully.

So I’ll be tough and endure all the pain.



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