ASICS Launches Support Your Marathoner Program For 2012 Honda LA Marathon



ASICS America Corporation, a proud partner of the 2012 Honda LA Marathon, has expanded its award-winning “Support Your Marathoner” program to the West Coast. Similar to the program offered at the 2011 ING New York City Marathon, it allows friends and family to send pictures, texts, and video messages of support to the marathon runner of their choice on race day.

Utilizing innovative technology, motivational messages can be delivered directly to an individual runner, precisely as they run past one of two giant video screens placed in various locations on the race course. Friends and family are encouraged to visit www.supportyourmarathoner.com to upload messages.

Social media will deliver additional moments of inspiration to runners, ensuring that no marathoner has to finish the race alone. The enhanced program now links the website (www.supportyourmarathoner.com) to the runner’s personal Facebook page allowing them to share requests for support with their entire online network. Additionally, every time a message of support is uploaded, the runner’s entire Facebook community is alerted, and encouraged to upload more messages. The Support Your Marathoner website also gives runners their own personalized support gallery of messages, pictures and videos to have after the race.

“We have a strong commitment to the athletes that make the courageous and life-changing decision to run a marathon,” says ASICS Vice President of Marketing Erik Forsell. “Each runner has to dig deep to get through those grueling 26.2 miles, and we believe nothing is more motivating than the support of family and friends.  We have seen firsthand the difference Support Your Marathoner can make in getting someone to the finish line, and we are proud to bring it to the Honda LA Marathon.”

The Support Your Marathoner website (www.supportyourmarathoner.com) is live now, and will be supported by email blasts from the Honda LA Marathon and ASICS’ own growing social media community.  Fans can follow the tweets and create their own with #ASICSrunsLA.

It’s not too late to register and train for the 2012 Honda LA Marathon with ASICS’ exclusive six-week training schedule by Coach Andrew Kastor. For more information and to register visit www.asicsamerica.com/lamarathon/marathon_training.aspx and www.lamarathon.com.

 

Runner’s body rebels, but there’s still hope for a strong finish

You can follow C.J.’s day-to-day training on her twitter page and watch for her stories in the Los Angeles Daily News.


By C.J. Lin, Daily News Staff Writer
Posted: 12/11/2011 01:00:00 AM PST

One step forward, two steps back.

Unfortunately, that’s not very helpful when you’re trying to run a marathon.

For the last few weeks, my training has been at a literal standstill.

I did eight miles one freezing morning about a month after I started running, and I guess I pushed too much too soon. What I thought was a lingering soreness in the arches of my feet was actually plantar fasciitis, where the tissue connecting the heel to toes becomes inflamed.

Oh, and somehow I blew out my knees, too.

Unfortunately, (again) these types of injuries are inevitable for runners, whether they be newbies or veterans, said Rayna Drago, coach of the L.A. Roadrunners marathon training group in Westlake Village.

“Marathon running is a real shock to your body,” Drago said. “Even if you’ve been athletic, it’s just something different for your body to take in all those miles. Your body is just waking up and saying, `Hello, what are we doing here?”‘

The most common injuries are shin splints, runner’s knee, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and some type of foot fracture, according to Dr. John Pagliano, a Long Beach sports medicine podiatrist.

And there’s more bad news – they’ll probably keep popping up for the first year for new runners.

“Your body’s just kind of got to learn what’s coming,” Drago said. “But it does subside after the first year.”

I don’t have a year. I only have three more months until the L.A. Marathon.

Suffice it to say, I’m getting pretty nervous. The finish line always seemed just a bit out of my reach, but even more so now.

But, I (and you) shouldn’t be discouraged, Drago said.

“It’s more frustrating than anything,” Drago said. “But it’s good when it happens at the beginning of training rather than at the end.”

For these types of overuse injuries, it doesn’t take too long to heal and get back up to speed, Drago said.

Be sure to ice anything that hurts and rest. But the key is to keep moving, just not in high-impact exercises.

“It’s also for your mental balance, that if you’re not running, at least I’m doing something,” she said.

Take a break by hopping on a bike, getting on the elliptical, going for a walk, swimming laps or even jogging in the pool, Drago said.

Take ibuprofen for the pain, and make sure you stretch sufficiently.

You’ll want to build up the muscles around the knee by doing strength training such as squats and lunges to help support you on those long miles, according to experts.

Pagliano recommends strength workouts three times a week on alternate days, which should include upper body strengthening.

And if the pain lingers for more than two weeks, that’s when you should go see someone.

Some tips to avoid running injuries include: shortening your stride, running on even surfaces, cross-training, and getting shoes fitted to your gait at a specialty running store, according to Runners’ World magazine.

So, there’s hope yet. I just have to take it easy for a couple of weeks.

“It’s possible to get right back out there and get back on it,” Drago said.

“And your body will just come along for the ride.”

Meb’s backstory

Russ sent me this post today from Meb Keflizighi’s brother Hawi. He passionately lays out how much preparation and focus went into Meb’s New York Marathon victory. This is a great piece of inspiration.


From Merhawi Keflezighi:

Meb has done his job and accomplished a lifelong personal and generational industry-wide dream. Now it is up to the rest of us to put this achievement in its proper context.

Meb_and_Merhawi_NYC_champMeb’s victory in the 2009 ING New York City Marathon is obviously very significant, newsworthy and historical, but it also has a personal element to every individual, organization and other entities involved with Meb (Meb the individual, family, San Diego community, Mammoth, UCLA, Eritreans, Italians, Nike, PowerBar, NYRR, New York City, the Marathon, the running industry, sports media, the running media which has followed Meb for a long time, long time fans, new fans, etc.). With so many affected entities, I don’t expect Meb’s victory to mean the same thing to everyone.

Continues…

Chicago wrap-up





Finally back home after a spectacular trip to Chicago. Russ and I went together, worked the Expo booth and then ran today. We woke up to 30 degree temperatures, and there must have been 500 runners huddled in the Hilton lobby waiting until the last moment to make the freezing dash out to the starting line. I was in the D corral, which allowed me to get right up to speed in the first mile. You have to see what 40,000 runners looks like to believe it. An absolutely giant group, with logistics to match. I thought the management team did a good job with the start/finish area, water stations and post race food, given the size of the field. The course covers 29 neighborhoods throughout the city and never once goes higher than 24 feet above sea level. Talk about a place to run your PR.

Russ, not having run a marathon in 25 years, ran a very solid 4:57. His day included bolting from the 5 hour pace group and passing 1,000 runners in the last 2 miles. Way to finish strong! I ran a steady 3:51:09, helped along by the 3:50 pace group. My goal was to run consistent 8:45-8:50 miles, and I was able to do that. The first 13 miles were no problem, then the running becomes more labor intensive up to 20 miles. The last 6 miles took a lot of effort. If I didn’t have the pace group to follow I surely would have lost at least 5 minutes in the last section of the race. The group was like a carrot dangling out there urging me to keep up. At 24 miles the course finally widens out, and Dean Karnazes passed me on the left. So I had a quick chat with him, then let him go. He was running the first of 2 loops of the course for 52 miles total on the day. What a guy. By the time I finished I was completely spent, and I was happy to know that I’d “left it all on the course.” It was still in the low 40s, so the mylar heat sheet was welcome protection from the elements.

There are an incredible number of spectators on the route, holding all manner of signs out and screaming encouragement at the runners. Amazing fan support. My favorite sign read, “Trample the wounded. Hurdle the dead.” Fortunately, I didn’t have to do either!

Tomorrow morning at the office we’ll have a debrief session and discuss our learnings with the staff. Stacy ran the Long Beach Marathon today, and she’ll give us her report as well. All in all, a great weekend, and it’s good to know that training actually works.

Peter

Battle of the Network Stars 1978

Now and then someone will send me a Youtube clip that is just too good to pass up. My longtime friend Tim Stapleton in New Jersey just forwarded me this segment from the Battle of the Network Stars Running Relay in 1978. A celebrity mile relay. Priceless! How about Lou Ferrigno handing off the baton to Valerie Bertinelli? Or David Letterman on the opening leg? Or Billy Crystal going toe-to-toe with LeVar Burton on the anchor leg? And Howard Cosell is calling the race. Why can’t we do this kind of thing anymore? Would stars show up for this? So entertaining.

Peter

SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014